Ep111-Blue Moon

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Live broadcast time: Saturday, June 7, 2014 9:11pm

Guest: Blue Moon
Topic: Hitler and WW2


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7 thoughts on “Ep111-Blue Moon

    1. Jan ErikJan Erik

      Japan was on the side with England in WW1. And bought outdated ships from them after WW1. They used the steel who they recycled to build sea power for their colonial expantion in the thirties !
      Think it was a geopolitical move of UK. And they set the posibilety for Japan to enter WW2 with Germany ETC !

      Geoplitics is longterm planing and a game who the herd always loose i think !

  1. Henkus

    The way i was raised (here in NL), either via school propaganda or social interaction (product of propaganda).
    It was all about how bad Hitler was and when i really think about it there are no REAL facts brought to the table
    about what he actually did to ‘repair’ the failing German economy after the Versaille treaty.
    Could it be that a guy like Hitler was a total puppet? Even discussing this nowdays here will awaken cognitive dissonance in people and immediately shut down any conversation…

    The whole 3rd Reich thing is for me still an open topic of discussion me but not for most. To be honest i really don’t know what happened since all history books are probably….. well….not true?

  2. UnrealUNreal


    All wars need some Psy-Ops to to work as planned…!

    Jose Barrera talks about the origins of mind-control as magic in this very thought-provoking interview with Jan Irvin of Gnostic Media;

  3. Jan ErikJan Erik

    world moral order map

    upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia…

    After the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany invaded Poland in September 1939, marking the beginning of the Second World War, the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was sent to aid in the defence of France. Germany invaded Belgium and the Netherlands on 10 May 1940, and three of their Panzer corps attacked France through the Ardennes and rapidly drove to the English Channel. By 21 May, the German forces had trapped the BEF, the remains of the Belgian forces, and three French armies in an area along the northern coast of France. Commander of the BEF General John Vereker, 6th Viscount Gort immediately saw that evacuation across the Channel was the best course of action, and began planning a withdrawal to Dunkirk, the closest location with good port facilities. A controversial Halt Order was issued with Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler’s approval 22 May. This gave the trapped Allied forces time to construct defensive works and pull back large numbers of troops toward Dunkirk. From 28–31 May 1940, in the Siege of Lille, the remaining 40,000 men of the once-formidable French First Army fought a delaying action against seven German divisions, including three armoured divisions.

    On the first day of the evacuation, only 7,669 men were evacuated, but by the ninth day a total of 338,226 soldiers had been rescued by a hastily-assembled fleet of over 800 boats. Many of the troops were able to embark from the harbour’s protective mole onto 39 British destroyers and other large ships, while others had to wade out from the beaches, waiting for hours in the shoulder-deep water. Some were ferried from the beaches to the larger ships by the famous little ships of Dunkirk, a flotilla of hundreds of merchant marine boats, fishing boats, pleasure craft, and lifeboats called into service for the emergency. The BEF lost 68,000 soldiers during the French campaign and had to abandon nearly all of their tanks, vehicles, and other equipment. In his speech to the House of Commons on 4 June Churchill reminded the country that “we must be very careful not to assign to this deliverance the attributes of a victory. Wars are not won by evacuations.”[3] The events at Dunkirk remain a prominent folk memory in the United Kingdom.

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunkirk_…

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