At least he wore his boots

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Top story in Toronto today, one of the coldest days of the year.

This story tests the limits of believability and, in my opinion, gullibility.

The new credo of emergency services drills and practices seems to be: Why waste a good simulation when you can make it a media event (hoax)?

A three-year-old Toronto boy has died in hospital after spending hours outside in the bitter cold after wandering away from the apartment building where he was staying with family around 4 a.m. wearing only a T-shirt, diaper and boots.

www.cbc.ca/m/touch/canada/toro…

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7 thoughts on “At least he wore his boots

  1. ab Post author

    The story now can die.

    All of the money will be going to the Marsh family, and Kozuch said he was happy to help them funnel it any way they choose.

    “It’s my hope that they set up a scholarship or grant or some sort of way to recognize this young boy that touched so many,” Kozuch said. “But at the end of the day, the decision to do that is theirs.”

    The only thing I think might be real is the money being raised. Real people have given money somewhere. I am not even sure the Marsh entity is even a real mother. Where the money lands is unverifiable, and quite simply, akin to throwing it out your window.

    All of this is NOT illegal, since people voluntarily gave their money – even if it under false pretenses.

    www.thestar.com/news/gta/2015/…

  2. ab Post author

    via www.theglobeandmail.com/news/t…
    The fundraiser campaign: www.tilt.com/campaigns/help-co…
    The organizer: www.facebook.com/jkozuch

    Does the organizer’s facebook page reveal a sim? Interestingly, tilt requires a facespook page to confirm one’s identity and avoid fraud. This person seems sim or spook like. Either way, a fairly barren facespook history.

    When one gives to tilt, as in this campaign, does this one private individual handle the money? Would you give money to someone in *hope* that they give it to the (so far unseen) family to handle the funeral? Since the raised amount is allegedly far and away more than a funeral could cost, what happens with the extra money?

    I am sure real people give money. There is real money being raised here I believe. If this event is a hoax, isn’t the money raised a result of fraud?

    Many fakeologists bring up this point. Is this the only real crime in telling a lie? Is a donation to a cause under fraudulent terms a crime? Somehow I think the answer is no. Any lawyers in the house?

    As I have stated before, psyOp hoaxes are LEGAL. There are no criminal laws against them. It only makes sense that the fundraisers are done legally, as wrong as it seems.

    1. FauxCapitalist

      Ab, it’s definitely illegal, if he knowingly set it up under false pretences :

      laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/ac…

      “380. (1) Every one who, by deceit, falsehood or other fraudulent means, whether or not it is a false pretence within the meaning of this Act, defrauds the public or any person, whether ascertained or not, of any property, money or valuable security or any service,

      (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to a term of imprisonment not exceeding fourteen years, where the subject-matter of the offence is a testamentary instrument or the value of the subject-matter of the offence exceeds five thousand dollars;”

      1. ab Post author

        I’m not sure you’re right about charitable donations. At best it appears to be a grey area.

        The “media” is now addressing the problems of “flash philanthropy”. Of course this helps google crowd out questioning the original problem story.

        www.thestar.com/news/gta/2015/…

        Tim Ryan, country manager at Tilt, which hosted the fundraiser for Elijah, says the website uses a two-step verification process to ensure funds end up in the hands of the intended recipient. The first step is automated. Their system checks to make sure that campaigns have links to active Facebook accounts, news articles, and include photos and other signs of legitimacy. Second, staff members at Tilt will contact the campaign organizer and may request photo ID or other documentation.

        “No matter how much money is raised, we won’t release the funds unless we’re convinced the money is going where it’s supposed to,” said Ryan.

        In a worst-case scenario, Tilt can reverse the payment and recover the funds if fraud is suspected.

        “At a global level, you can never truly be 100 per cent sure,” he said.

  3. Johan BackesJohan Backes

    Prophet Elijah’s story starts with the 33rd chapter of the Old Testament.

    Elijah’s “March” (not the babies real name by the way its actually Marsh, shoddy reporting but neatly convenient for the biblical narrative) in the Bible was a result of Queen Jezebel’s decree to kill him as Gods last remaining prophet in the Baal worshiping kingdom of King Ahab. Elijah learned of this plot and “marched” 40 days/nights (4 am reference?) with no food or water against a strong wind (-28 wind chill?) and huddled in a cave (the window well where the boy is found is a cave analog). In the Bible version the wind was so strong it caused fire and earthquakes, does this happen in the little boy version as well? Sure it does, as the boy was found beside Neptune Ave [Neptune was the name that ancient Romans gave to the Greek god of the sea and earthquakes, Poseidon. He was the brother of Jupiter (Zeus) and of Pluto (Hades)]

    The Prophet Elijah survives in the Bible story despite the people wanting to kill him he ends up talking to Jesus and training the next prophet Elisha… is this story some revision where they get to kill Elijah in the wilderness? The stories are the same with Baal beating God.

    Interesting, too many connections to ignore. Where was this child’s survival instinct? How did he trek through snow and backyard fences with no clothes on for almost a kilometer let alone open the heavy steel door to the apartment complex? Seems dodgy at least and the biblical references/coincidences are too cute for my sensibilities. This is just a Satanic revision of an old testament story. Nice try, next.

    Happy hoaxing

    1. ab Post author

      Thanks JC. You just explained how all bible-believers will instantly recognize and believe this story. The name “mistake” was certainly on purpose.

      I’d like to see “super toddler” actually walking through the lobby on video pushing the doors instead of a weak photoslop.

      The address, 145 Neptune, is “welfare” housing. www.torontohousing.ca/our_hous…

      I noticed that most of the psyOps/hoaxes shootings/events are said to be staged at these locations. These people are already somewhat beholden/compromised to the state so are unlikely to speak out in any way, even if they were allowed on air.

      Preying on the down and out is quite despicable.

    2. FauxCapitalist

      Thanks for that very informative biblical interpretation, JB.

      And continuing it, here’s a handwritten note supposedly distributed during the Saturday vigil:

      “I’m so sorry beautiful little boy that this had to happen to someone as young and innocent as you,” began one, handwritten note. “Sometimes the world works in strange ways,” it continued. “We will look for you in the Ontario night sky.”

      www.thestar.com/news/gta/2015/…

      Looking for him in the night sky because he’s riding off to heaven in a chariot, just like the prophet Elijah? biblehub.com/2_kings/2-11.htm

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