“This is reality: how come it hasn’t been dealt with?“

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I always wondered how many real plane crashes there have been, since so many have been faked over the years.

This one may be one of them – since no one, young and old, has ever heard of it.

Exploding mid-air on July 8, 1965, Canadian Pacific Flight 21 plummeted into the woods in the British Columbia Interior, killing all 52 people aboard. While the investigation determined a bomb brought down the passenger plane, and four suspects were at the top of the list, no charges were laid. The National goes in-depth to uncover the largest unsolved murder on Canadian soil. 17:30

www.cbc.ca/news/thenational/bo…

An excellent podcast goes along with it.

www.cbc.ca/podcasting/includes… via @PodcastAddict

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9 thoughts on ““This is reality: how come it hasn’t been dealt with?“

  1. barbm124

    if there are, they wouldn’t tell us or if they cannot avoid it they will invent a colorful story with naked bodies falling from heaven, red “black boxes” playing laughing pilots, inaccessible crash sites, let some VIP’s disappear from the stage as crash victims, etc. News are being written by story tellers, not by reality.

  2. Rachel

    I put this on Discord, but I’ll flesh it out a little here. I agree with Gaia, they have to report real crashes/disappearances.

    For an airline company a disappearance would most probably been less of a problem than a crash because who knows what happened. But for a crash, the desire to shift the blame, so, i) they don’t have to pay out in compensation, ii) they don’t have to ground other planes that might suffer the same defect, iii) they don’t scare off passengers because their aircraft drop out of the sky. — It becomes clear why blackbox data was introduced in the first place, to protect us from a conspiracy of vested interests making up stories to avoid culpability.

    So, we have the lingering shot of the plane’s logbook in the 1965 news footage. This surely used to confirm how many people were on board the stricken flight. And if you wanted to add two to four people who would later become the main suspects for planting a bomb, we have the first tangible evidence in what they chose to show as ‘important’.

    Where as these days there might be reasons to use special effects to create fake events, I’d say the past was more about finding excuses to explain cock-ups. Taking the Canadian Pacific Flight 21 crash as real, and also the preceding 1950 Canadian Pacific Flight 108 crash, Canada does have a lot of trees for them both to come down in. It’s more about the story, and the prior crash could have been penned by Hitchcock. Worth it to set a precedent regarding terrorism as opposed to accidents? – www.canada.com/Your+crime+name…

    What we know… They dismiss the idea of a catastrophic failure in one sentence, even though that would be the logical first place to start and stay on. They then go on about two different types of explosives – so, 100% it was a bomb, but they are not prepared to be pinned down to facts about the type. That’s telling in itself. Added, there are elements of the 1950 crash – the witness seeing the plane falling from the sky meaning it must be a bomb, make it into this story also.

    They name four suspects in the papers. Not heard of libel in Canada then? ( www.whitehorsestar.com/News/yu… )

    In the case of Flight 21, all of the passengers were suspects – and all were investigated.

    It was eventually narrowed down to four suspects, whose names were even published in newspapers along with the reasons why they were suspects – information which would never appear in publications today.

    “I was amazed when I reviewed the (newspaper article) a few weeks ago, that they could name (the suspects) without having proof,” Cameron said.

    They then narrow it down to two people. How exactly? A gambler taking a plane to nowhere and a loner who likes guns – not train spotting or birding, no, guns…

    Conclusion. I’d go with a catastrophic failure which the Canadian Pacific Railroad (parent company) wasn’t prepared to take a hit for. A backdated insurance fiddle via one of the two main created suspects to pay for the ‘clear up’ narrative. But this is pure speculation based on the way they chose to frame the story, the number of Douglas DC-variants generally dropping out of the sky, the repeated witness statement in both stories, and a little look into the history of the type of people controlling the parent company and what they got away with building the Canadian Pacific Railway.

  3. gaiagaia

    This also looks like a real accidental crash in very rugged and climatically unstable terrain:

    TAME Flight 120

    “TAME Flight 120 was a Boeing 727-134 airliner, registration HC-BLF, named El Oro, operating as a scheduled international passenger flight between Quito, Ecuador and Cali, Colombia, with a scheduled stopover at the Ecuadorian border town of Tulcán.

    The aircraft crashed while on approach to Tulcán’s Teniente Coronel Luis A. Mantilla International Airport on January 28, 2002.

    The pilot flew the approach incorrectly in reportedly foggy conditions, and the aircraft flew into the side of the Cumbal Volcano, located near Ipiales, Colombia, at 10:23 in the morning. All passengers and crew were killed in the crash.”

    And to answer the question; I think they have to report real crashes, they may overprint them with false narratives (like MH17) or they just report it minor, like the one in Canada and this one in Colombia.

    Not too much information, just the bare minimum, if no agenda can be pushed.

  4. Rachel

    Another interesting article – www.whitehorsestar.com/News/yu… :

    At that time, only one airliner bombing had occurred in Canada.

    It was another Canadian Pacific Airlines flight, which crashed in Quebec in 1950, again killing everyone on board.

    “In that case, it was a love triangle scenario … a husband and girlfriend wanted to get rid of the wife,” Cameron said.

    Police found three people guilty of the bombing, all of whom were subsequently hanged for the crime.

    The woman among the three, Cameron said, was the last woman to be hanged in Canada.

    Hmm, last hanged woman in Canada… but it gets better, from another report ( www.canada.com/Your+crime+name… ):

    Investigators in the Canadian Pacific case quickly came to the conclusion its aircraft had been the victim of the word’s third, and deadliest, act of in-flight terrorism.

    Strikingly similar to 1965 actually, a witness and some woods…

    A fisherman near Sault-au-Cochon, 70 kilometres north of Quebec City, reported seeing a smoking plane fall toward Cap Tormente, on the north shore of the river. Some men working on a nearby railway line rushed to the wooded crash scene. There were no survivors to be found: the dead included four children and three U.S. mining executives.

    Hmm, what’s the chances?

  5. Rachel

    I’m going with a real crash, xileffilex. I agree with you regarding the logbook, and it’s curious they’ve left the wreckage in place, but then again, if it costs money to remove it and they don’t have to, why would they?

    Found this regarding the plane, the DC-4 variant having three disappear without trace against it between 1950 and 1964 ( www.oddee.com/item_98913.aspx ) :

    In 1944, the USAAF requested that Douglas come up with a pressurized, stretched derivative of the DC-4, with more powerful engines. The result, the “XC-112A”, performed its first flight on 15 February 1946 — but by that time World War II was over, with the US military shrinking rapidly and little money for new aircraft. Douglas, however, continued development on the aircraft as the “DC-6”, with the first example performing its initial flight on 29 June 1946, with initial deliveries, to American and United Airlines, before the end of the year. The prototype was fitted up to production standard and sold. A series of inflight fires, including one that led to a fatal crash, led to the grounding of the DC-6 fleet in 1947, but they were back in the air in 1948.

    The initial DC-6 (no suffix) variant was difficult to tell from a DC-4, the biggest giveaway being that the windows were rectangular instead of oval. The DC-6 was stretched by 2.06 meters (6 feet 9 inches) to 30.66 meters (100 feet 7 inches), giving normal passenger load as from 48 to 52 seats — but 86 passengers could be carried in a high-density all-economy arrangement. MTO weight was raised to 44,100 kilograms (97,200 pounds). It retained the Double Wasp engines, though they were the more powerful R-2800-CA15 variant, with 1,565 kW (2,100 HP) and water injection.

    airvectors.net/avdc4.html

    1. ab Post author

      It did seem odd that there were 4 pretty good candidates on board at the same time to be considered suspects.
      Other notables include being able to buy life insurance at the airport at the last minute and no security whatsoever for those boarding or loading the plane. Did this change after these events?

  6. xileffilex

    Looks like another routine staged crash.
    Further reading…. [2011]
    www.alaskahighwaynews.ca/opini…

    Any lucky survivors? You bet!

    Did anyone report they had missed the plane? You bet they did. Vancouver Canucks General Manager, Max McNab, was booked on the plane. He was to go to Prince George for a junior hockey school but was too busy discussing a new hockey arena for Vancouver and couldn’t get away. Lucky him!

    suuuure

    Passenger list etc
    www.gendisasters.com/british-c…

    Standard crash site memorials and “left wreckage”

    “bodies were coming down” suuuure they were
    newsinteractives.cbc.ca/longfo…

    And check the carefully placed, undamaged, plane logbook in the video in the above link. Neat.
    It looks like a Lockerbie prequel.

    The details of the RCMP’s four main suspects, who Arntfield agrees should all be at the top of the list, are also “uncanny … it’s something out of a Hitchcock film. ‘Strangers on a Plane,’ we could call this. Four absolute strangers, each with something to hide. Each of whom will end up being, at some point, a suspect in this case.”

    Yep, like something out of a film.

    Shaw-MacLaren is sparing with the details of what he saw. He doesn’t want others burdened by the gruesome memories he’s lived with for the past 53 years.

    Just another “witness”

    Just another steaming pile of aircraft junk.

    1. ab Post author

      The old age LARPers fooled me. The story, if fake, sure is well developed. The question remains:are there any real plane crashes described in the media?

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