TRANSMISSIBLE DISEASES THEORY DISPROVED

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TRANSMISSIBLE DISEASES THEORY DISPROVED

??INFLUENZA – HISTORY, EPIDEMIOLOGY, AND SPECULATION

Three historical studies prove that a disease-causing virus could not have been the cause of the claimed pandemic.

Dr. Richard E. Shope was, among other things, a professor, virologist, and member of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research New York City.

In his 1958 teaching lecture on influenza, he shows that all the claims of communicable disease by a disease-causing virus cannot stand up to scientific scrutiny; more to the point, they have been disproven.

The incompetence of many professors, physicians and bio-informaticians lies among other things in not being able to look beyond the blindly rehearsed dogma and to check the theses that are claimed to be scientific on the basis of historical reappraisal and control. This is not done.

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3 pandemics were selected for consideration. One from ancient times, before the speed of modern travel arrived to confuse the epidemiological picture (1789), one from the beginning of the bacteriological era (1889) and one modern (1918).

It is concluded that, due to the circumstances of the pandemic, a case-to-case transmission is very doubtful and there must be other factors for the origin of these diseases than those suspected.

It is concluded that the treatment was much more dangerous for the diseases than the diseases themselves.

Pigs contracted swine flu only when exposed to meteorological stress, such as cold wet bad weather in the fall, and not by administration of suspected influenza viruses via a hidden carrier.

Volunteers could not become infected with influenza in a contagion experiment in which they were in direct close contact with influenza sufferers and their secretions were sprayed directly into their throats and pharynxes.

telegra.ph/Influenza—History…

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H/t Jan Erik

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