Astroturfing

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Astroturfing, or installing fake grass, is the opposite of grassroots.  Instead of being natural or organic, it’s artificial or fake.

This is important to fakeologists, as the comments on a blog or youtube can go a long way to shape people’s opinions. Most want to conform, so if their views are counter to what they’re reading, they will most likely stay silent rather than be attacked or embarrassed.

I related an anecdote I was told last week on a past audio. Apparently nursing students in Ontario are, as part of their education, told to go online and help correct medical myths being promoted in comments sections. While this may seem honorable, it could be looked at as another form of Astroturfing. Most here agree that not all modern allopathic medicine is the way to go. Steering people away from homeopathy with their “science” could be looked at as a form of propaganda.

Astroturfing happens everywhere, especially in the corporate world.  Product and service review sites have a major credibility problem if they can’t verify the reviewer.

Its warning comes after an Accor hotels staff member was reportedly caught posting more than 100 positive reviews on TripAdvisor for Accor hotels around the world.

“The boom in hotel review sites has given rise to the practice of ‘astroturfing’ or the writing of fake reviews by companies to promote their own accommodation,” Choice head of media Tom Godfrey said.

via Choice warns TripAdvisor users to be aware of fake hotel reviews | Travel | Travel News and Holiday Deals | | The Courier-Mail.

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1 thought on “Astroturfing

  1. columjaddica

    I’ve been using this term and lot and it seems people usually know what it means without any explanation as long as it’s in context.

    “The only protest or outrage you’ll see on TV these days is astroturfed, you know, like that Kokesh guy or the trucker thing…”

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