Lotto lies

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Hamilton woman loses ticket  but wins big — think  50 million big   Toronto StarAnother very difficult to believe lottery story from the Ontario Lying and Gaming Commission. The lessons I’ve learned from the story are pay for your tickets with a credit card, enjoying being recorded on video while buying stuff, and be happy the OLG is working hard to make sure they pay out money fairly, even if you’re not paying attention.

My question is, does it make it easier to create phony winners when they say they will go to the winner as opposed to waiting for the winner to come to them? It probably doesn’t matter when you control the entire situation.

An unbelievable set of circumstances have come together for Kathryn Jones, who won $50 million from an unclaimed Lotto Max prize drawn a year ago — a win for which she lost the ticket and never checked the numbers.

via Hamilton woman loses ticket, but wins big — think $50 million big | Toronto Star.

There are so many problems with this story. The biggest one is how can you have a winner without a ticket? Wouldn’t this simple requirement open up a pandora’s box of people claiming they’ve won? Is the OLG going to hire 10,000 investigators to follow up on anyone’s claim?

How long does Shoppers, or any store for that matter, retain recorded video? My guess is that most won’t keep it that long, certainly not for a year. Most overwrite every 24 hours, and only grab the video if something occurs.

2 thoughts on “Lotto lies

  1. cjcolumjaddica

    Anybody that has any common sense knows that the lottery is merely entertainment. Obviously many poor people have no common sense because they are always in line at the liquor store placing extravagant and specific ticket orders.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if the whole thing is fake, I don’t know anybody personally that has ever won over $500. I DO know people who have won several thousand on slots at a casino but when they tell me the story and the details it really sounds like the casino selected them to win to encourage others to continue playing. I have a friend that works in IT at a casino and I’m a bit curious if he’s discovered anything like that, the casino specifically choosing a person to win at a specific time to encourage the other patrons. It’s all computerized so I’d say that’s definitely possible. The idea being to monitor the moods of your patrons and select somebody to win *only* after it looks like everybody is becoming discouraged.

  2. Tom DalpraTom

    Yes, it seems fairly narrative-based, run-of-the-mill bollocks. Makes sense.

    Everywhere I go in England on every newsagent and convenience store and at prime time on Saturday night television, I see the obvious 666 National Lottery symbol.

    Ah…that old fake paradigm.

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