AC0340-Napoleon, Delcroix, Kham, SMJ

Marin2Dirtybennylike this

More combative debate, K tells what she’d do to get out of a big ticket. Can Sean get K to let go of the Ball, or get her to comprehend the gravity fraud?

K admits she was just 0;saying stuff” without evidence before when confronted by SMJ.

Tune in! Join our all new @SMJ inspired alchemy hustle channel!

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Xileffilex
Member
Xileffilex(@xileffilex)
3 years ago

I like the way this youtuber responds to attacks on his video. [ignore the flat earth prefix in the title, concentrate on the CAVENDISH EXPERIMENT moiety] Is there any faithful duplication of the Cav Exp?

www.youtube.com/watch?v=udn_9K…

Last word from Miles Mathis
if we have now entered the realm of forces of 10-10N, we must be a bit more rigorous with our analyses.
LOL [wrt the video posted by Kham] !

Khammad
Khammad(@khammad)
4 years ago

Cavendish Experiment

High school physics teacher demonstrates cavendish 2-ball experiment.

m.youtube.com/watch?v=11sLusnV…

Khammad
Khammad(@khammad)
4 years ago

Thank you Ab for this opportunity to express myself as well as others on your blog. I appreciate all the hard work and effort you do on a daily basis!
‘0 0’
<
(___)

Khammad
Khammad(@khammad)
4 years ago

Ab, Twas not me that brought up flat earth. Don’t bring up flat earth with K then, please, anybody. I tried to get Denny Napolean Wilson to talk about other stuff but he keeps bringing it up with me. But first, one definition of Gravity: a large mass inducing a pull on a small mass. A good example of this is In a dish of soapy water, a large soap bubble will attract smaller soap bubbles. This might be the definition of gravity to some, but industry which uses the science doesn’t care about the esoterica. ESOTERICA: knowledge that is… Read more »

UNreal
UNreal(@unreal)
4 years ago
Reply to  Khammad

 khammad – Your orange peel map is interesting: •How do you calculate the heights of the topography i.e. mountains*on the peel ? – The blue dots you reference would be placed at very different locations in any one of the hundreds of projections used for representing a theoretical oblate spheroid or geoid – the actual shape of the scientific earth/blue marble. When a “spherical” mapping system is used – zooming in on the blue dots will take you to a flat map where no arc-circle is used and flatness presumed. Amazon deliver their goods and services locally on a large-scale… Read more »

Khammad
Khammad(@khammad)
4 years ago
Reply to  UNreal

K Answers Kwestions Q: How do you calculate heights on this orange peel? A: Heights are not relevant in this example of how distances change when going from a spherical shape to a flat shape in the orange peel example. I’m not arguing that height change, only distance. Q: Amazon deliver their goods and services locally on a large-scale map with curvature neglected. Is curvature neglected? A: Just like the orange peel example of the globe earth getting flattened, the same principal applies to cities. Since the earth curves 8 inches in 1 mile, even when you flatten your city… Read more »

UNreal
UNreal(@unreal)
4 years ago
Reply to  Khammad

Is it too much to ask that you recognise (without the appeal to ridicule K’s) that curvature is neglected in large-scale maps used by Amazon to deliver goods*? – Regarding altitude, it is a valid question but it does not seem part of your curriculum as you choose to avoid the question altogether ? – The reality is that the theoretical oblate spheroid (or Geoid) model of earth provide no exacting manner to verify altitude other than to refer to the earth’s gravitational centre that has not been constant as the shape of the earth and its theoretical mathematical circumferences… Read more »

Khammad
Khammad(@khammad)
4 years ago
Reply to  Fakeologist

If there are no fat molecules in your soap dish then what are the bubbles attracted to?

Marin2
Marin2(@marin2)
4 years ago
Reply to  Fakeologist

Soap is made from fat. I did that in high school chemistry. Did you? –

Yep, as history will have it, those terrible Germans were able to make soap from human fat in their concentrationcamps.( = Arbeitslager)

Khammad
Khammad(@khammad)
4 years ago
Reply to  Fakeologist

I like the soap bubbles in a dish of water example to show how objects with less friction will be able to move toward each other. How about another example.

OBSERVATION
In a bath tub full of floaty play toys, no soap, left on its own for a couple of hours, floaty toys will gather together in clumps, when before we’re somewhat evenly distributed.

In repeated observations, floaty toys ALWAYS clump together in the bathtub.

QUESTION
Why do floaty toys clump together in a full bathtub?

Antipodean
Antipodean(@antipodean)
4 years ago
Reply to  Khammad

This is quite interesting. The distance to the horizon is limited to where our eye level reaches the top of the curvature.
dizzib.github.io/earth/curve-c…

Smj
Smj(@smj)
4 years ago