Beware the 33 year old and the 6 million meme

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Not quite sure the purpose of phony corporate hack stories.

Could it be to extort more security software service money from clueless big corporations? Seems unlikely, but I don’t have a good working theory as to the motive to produce such silly tropes.

Even IF a hacker got the info, what exactly could he do with social security account numbers and bank accounts? No one has ever written a story about how the info could be used for fraudulent purposes.

Of course, that detail is totally beside the point of scaring you and corporations out of your security money.

A GitHub user alerted Capital One to the potential data theft, who in turn alerted the Federal Bureau of Investigation, according to the DOJ’s statement. The allegations have not been proven in court. Thompson, 33, made her initial appearance in U.S. District Court in Seattle on Monday and was ordered detained pending a hearing on Aug. 1, according to the statement.

Source: Hacker obtained personal information of 6 million people in Canada | CBC News

Update 7/31- Our sim-villain is now revealed to be transgender, illegal, and an ex-Amazon employee. Checking off even more memes and tropes!

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3 thoughts on “Beware the 33 year old and the 6 million meme

  1. xileffilex

    I haven’t believed any of these scare-porn hacking stories which “emerge” every so often. Best of the recent bunch was a “data breach” at British Airways [self-confessed] which led to a nice £183m bonus for the Government as well as “european data authorties” from the “fine”.

    As well as the points DBuser makes, the lawyers will also come in for a drink as the company “appeals”.
    www.ft.com/content/197a6758-a1…
    Remaining in the EU also gets a helping hand…

    Please use the sharing tools found via the share button at the top or side of articles. Copying articles to share with others is a breach of FT.com T&Cs and Copyright Policy. Email licensing@ft.com to buy additional rights. Subscribers may share up to 10 or 20 articles per month using the gift article service. More information can be found at www.ft.com/tour.
    www.ft.com/content/197a6758-a1…

    The fine comes in the wake of GDPR, the EU’s new rules on data protection, which came into force in May last year. It allows for fines of up to 4 per cent of global revenues or €20m, whichever is greater. Under the old regime the maximum penalty was £500,000.

    And to prove the “data breach” we need a “victim”.
    Served up here

    www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-48…
    British Airways faces record £183m fine for data breach
    8 July 2019

    David Champion believes that the BA data breach probably led to his credit card being used fraudulently.
    He says he was notified that his card had been used in an attempt to buy items at Harrods by phone while he was in Malaysia.
    “BA are claiming there were no fraudulent transactions from the leak. My card details, I don’t think, weren’t exposed anywhere else,” he told the BBC.
    The transaction was rejected and Mr Champion was not left out of pocket.
    “BA contacted me in August/September about the breach, that addresses and emails were leaked. Later they said credit card details were too,” he added.

    Breach proven, lol!

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