The Piper Alpha North Sea Oil Rig disaster, Scotland July 6 1988

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  • #263891
    xileffilex
    Participant

    Starter…

    Check – survivors [6:45 onwards]

    Check plastic surveon Alisdair Matheson [8.50] who was flown in specially, having treated victims of the Bradford football stadium fire [q.v.]

    “Insurance losses could be £500m…world oil prices have gone up in response…”

    229 men were working, relaxing…about 30 extra men were aboard….164 oil men died”

    Leaking gas on the Occidental Oil drilling platform ignited late in the evening of 6 July 1988, causing a devastating blaze in which 167 of the 226 men on board perished…

    Many of the oil workers leapt 100ft (30m) into the sea to escape the fire and toxic fumes, despite being told their jump would almost certainly be fatal.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/witness/july/6/newsid_3036000/3036510.stm

    survivor

    The BBC’s Jane Franchi was the first reporter to break the news…[2013 video]
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-23210048

    More BBC official narrative, survivors’ stories here refined over 25 years.
    and the documentary of the event wins an award at the Edinburgh Film Festival
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-23100125

    Survivor Roy Carey 25 years later with his tale
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01bql1j

    more tales
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01bnzz6
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-22840445

    • This topic was modified 6 years, 4 months ago by xileffilex.
    #264503
    xileffilex
    Participant

    We need survivors to tell the tale. Let’s have a closer look.
    Listen to Roy in 2013
    It’s all here, pp 102/3 in the official narrative book
    Fire in the Night: The Piper Alpha Disaster
    By Stephen McGinty

    Roy is a jumper

    You wonder why people would jump out of a 30 – 40 storey block window when fires are at the back [?], well I know because I jumped as well. I was very lucky to survive when i hit the sea, I went very deep ,very deep….finally I did hit the surface, I looked up and you [sic] were under a grill there’s no other word to describe it. The top of my head started to cook . Steam was rising off the water and I was really in a bad way then

    http://www.nytimes.com/1988/07/08/world/165-feared-dead-from-oil-rig-blast.html
    Roy was the star survivor
    ”It was a case of fry and die or jump and try,” Roy Carey, a 45-year-old survivor, his eyes swollen and scorched, told a group of reporters from his hospital bed. ”There was no time to ask -it was over the side or nothing. I just dived – it may have been 60 feet.”

    http://stanforddailyarchive.com/cgi-bin/stanford?a=d&d=stanford19880708-01.2.14#
    . A rigger on the platform, Derek Ellington, said he heard a gas leak “screaming like a banshee” before the first of a series of explosions. “It was just bloody horrific, I can tell you,”

    we are told in the book it’s exactly 68 feet…


    Roy at the time.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/north_east/7473050.stm

    some survivors and deceased from the Middlesbrough area are listed here
    http://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news/local-news/piper-alpha-survivor-recalls-tragedy-3729810

    end result..

    £5bn invested in offshore safety
    It led to a drive to improve and invest in health and safety – changes which proved to be long overdue. The platform’s owners, Canada-based Occidental Petroleum, was seriously criticised by the disaster inquiry and paid out millions of pounds in compensation to families

    Images:

    Armand Hammer with survivor Erland Grieve

    and with Andy Mochan [who has apparentl since died]

    One of the divers ED PUNCHARD, has moved to Australia and has embarked on a film career to escape the memory
    http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/piper-alpha-disaster-25-years-2037410

    Injuries to Dave Lambert

    source: http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/piper-alpha-disaster-25-years-2031147
    where we also hear survival stories from Joe Meanen, Billy Clayton.

    more “jumper” talk

    Watching the 9/11 coverage with wife Olive, Billy was raging as footage of people jumping to their deaths was described as suicide leaps…“They’re saying they’re committing suicide but the heat, the fire in that building will be pushing them out of the windows.
    “They’re at the point of desperation where they’re not bothered where they go.”


    Diana with Michael Bradley from Hull. source:
    http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1988/07/09/page/4/article/no-hope-left-for-149-missing-rig-workers

    “I’m amazed at how well they are [Margaret] Thatcher said after visiting the injured [in Aberdeen Royal Infirmary] An incomplete list of the dead and missing only includes one foreigner, Jurgen Tilo Stwerka of Hessen, West Germany. Other foreigners aboard the rig included two Americans and two Canadians.

    #264877
    Tom Dalpra
    Participant

    Thanks xileffilex. Interesting to start looking at it.

    I wonder what we’re talking about, exactly?
    Are these oil-rig workers in make-up on highly paid overtime, partaking in a big ‘safety’ drill?

    The whole set-up, of course, to us, looks tailor-made for this being a complete hoax. But from what I’ve looked at so far I can’t find anything glaringly obvious to give the game away.
    No exploding trousers moment yet, but I perhaps detected a bit of gentle Duper Delight from Roy Carey from 1:04 here:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01bql1j

    With it being out at sea like that, it would make it easy to just, make-pretend, if you will. Not too many unpredictable prying eyes out there.

    A few well paid scafolders and oil rig men. They’re doing it for oil rig safety reasons, of course. It’s all for the greater good. Have a fire and a helicopter ride.
    Chuck a bit of make-up on. Wear some plastic bags on your hands and get a visit from Princess Di. Who is gonna question it? Bob’s your Uncle – Fanny’s yer Auntie Jean.

    hg

    This guy wasn’t burnt that badly. His moustache is fine.
    ds

    Is it normal to leave a patient with severe burns exposed to infection in this way? Maybe it’s normal to let the air get to it, but I’m not sure…never worked on a burns ward…though I know Arthur C. Clarke there should be wearing gloves.

    fd

    Who was the coroner on this one xileffilex? Anyone we know?

    DalTampra

    #265173
    xileffilex
    Participant

    Who was the coroner on this one xileffilex? Anyone we know?

    As usual, we get a

    Public Inquiry

    On the thread where you broached this,Tom, I mentioned Lord Cullen [Dunblne Inquiry] was in charge.
    My rule of thumb is that most inquiries cover an event where the official narrative is highly questionable.

    The injuries are the big give away – the photos reminded me of the Hitler East Prussia bomb plot photo shoot from 1944.

    This academic paper on the concatenation of events on Piper Alpha stems from Stanford University, California

    Click to access Learning%20from%20the%20Piper%20Alpha%20Accident.pdf

    Allegedly

    Click to access Public-Inquiries-Review-June-2008-doc.pdf

    Public inquiries have been identified as “the most valuable source of information to help prevent recurrence of disasters”

    or for papering over any major drill hoax.
    See page 10 there where all our favourites are listed together. see also pp 15 et seq. Piper Alpha is on page 20 nested among a raft of familiar events.See also the final pages in this drill of drills “On Behalf of the Cabinet Office Emergency Planning College
    http://www.epcollege.com/epc/training/meet-our-trainers/dr-lucy-easthope/

    Dr Lucy Easthope is the course lead for Recovery Planning, CBRN Recovery Planning and Mass Fatalities Planning with a particular interest in Disaster Victim Identification……Lucy sits as a specialist on the Cabinet Office NRR Behavioural Sciences Group and acts as a technical advisor to the Home Office on Mass Fatalities planning. She has a law degree from the University of Bristol, an MSc in Risk, Crisis and Disaster Management from the University of Leicester and a PhD awarded by Lancaster University. – See more at: http://www.epcollege.com/epc/training/meet-our-trainers/dr-lucy-easthope/#sthash.X3e4TSlE.dpuf – See more at: http://www.epcollege.com/epc/training/meet-our-trainers/dr-lucy-easthope/#sthash.X3e4TSlE.dpuf

    Oh wow…it’s an industry.

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 4 months ago by xileffilex.
    • This reply was modified 6 years, 4 months ago by xileffilex.
    #268877
    Nemesis
    Participant

    The accident cost the Lloyd’s insurance marketmore than £1bn, making it the largest insured man-made catastrophe. Occidental paid out $100m (£66m) to families of the deceased but escaped any kind of criminal or civil sanction. No one was made personally liable in the courts either.

    http://www.theguardian.com/business/2013/jul/04/piper-alpha-disaster-167-oil-rig

    Links to “An Inconvenient truth” Enviro-Mentalist Messiah Al Gore

    ‘ABC Goes After Gore Connection To Occidental’

    http://www.aim.org/media-monitor/abc-goes-after-gore-connection-to-occidental/

    #269339
    xileffilex
    Participant

    The accident cost the Lloyd’s insurance marketmore than £1bn, making it the largest insured man-made catastrophe. Occidental paid out $100m (£66m) to families of the deceased but escaped any kind of criminal or civil sanction. No one was made personally liable in the courts either.

    hmmmm
    It’s well down the league table now after Katrina, Fukushima Tsunami, WTC 911 etc
    http://www.iii.org/fact-statistic/catastrophes-global
    but it’s still top of the charts in the Energy table: 1.8 bn USD [2013 equivalent value]

    http://www.iii.org/fact-statistic/man-made-disasters

    ENERGY

    Some 167 crew members lost their lives in a July, 1988 fire and explosion aboard the Piper Alpha oil platform in the North Sea. The incident, which caused property damage losses of $1.8 billion in 2013 dollars, represents the largest single property damage event in a Marsh’s study of losses in the energy industry from 1972 to 2013.

    #269471
    Tom Dalpra
    Participant

    Nemesis quoted: The accident cost the Lloyd’s insurance marketmore than £1bn, making it the largest insured man-made catastrophe.

    The incident, which caused property damage losses of $1.8 billion in 2013 dollars, represents the largest single property damage event in a Marsh’s study of losses in the energy industry from 1972 to 2013.

    All these records. Crikey that was an expensive little fire.
    So the rig was a right off…
    Off shore drilling rigs can cost billions of dollars in today’s money.

    But there’s certainly a lot of money sloshing around oil rigs, along with the oil and the sea water.

    Here’s one at the link which is apparently the worlds largest and it cost $3 billion to build:

    http://www.industrytap.com/worlds-largest-offshore-oil-platform-engineering-masterpiece/20699

    hg

    Here’s another big rig.
    fd

    The piper Alpha was tiny compared to those ones, of course.
    ds

    1.8 BILLION for that? Pah!

    DalTampra

    #269836
    rgos
    Participant

    Nice one, guys. I like these retro psyops.

    I think we can safely call this one a drill. Ha.

    Drill and scam.

    #277071
    Tom Dalpra
    Participant

    Let’s have a look at the pictures we were shown.

    gf
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1031994/The-day-sea-caught-20-years-Piper-Alpha-explosion-survivors-finally-able-tell-story.html

    The above picture comes from an article in The Daily Mail, on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the disaster in 1988. The title of the piece reads ”The Day The Sea caught fire”.
    Mmmm the day the sea caught fire…the only thing on fire I can see in this picture is some kind of flame on the end of what looks like a crane arm. This crane arm is on a structure in the foreground.
    The actual incident, where the black smoke is coming from, is on the other rig behind it.

    This one:
    hg

    So what are we looking at in that other picture?

    MEET THAROS!!!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transocean_Marianas
    FD

    Nowadays called Transocean Marianas this hulk is described as an Earl & Wright Sedco 700 design semi-submersible drilling unit capable of operating in harsh environments and water depths up to 7,000 feet

    A semi- submersible drilling unit. A portable, inhabitable oil rig it seems.
    However, we find that back in 1988 old Transocean Marianas was known as Tharos and:
    the vessel operated as a large firefighting, construction, diving support and accommodation vessel equipped with a helicopter and a hospital ship with 22 beds, that rescued survivors from the Piper Alpha oil platform disaster

    ds

    fd

    The Piper Alpha was situated on the Piper oilfield, approximately 120 miles northeast of Aberdeen. At 9:55 there was the first alarm sounded by 10:30 we’re told that The Tharos drew along side.

    That was handy wasn’t it? How the heck did this absolute state of the art piece of kit, the future of oil rigs it seems, find itself there so quickly?

    It answered an emergency call? Is it normal for these huge firefighting platforms to hang about around Scottish oil fields?
    Maybe it is…?

    It makes Piper Alpha look like a dirty old rig being demolished, anyway.

    Anyway, not to worry, the Memorial looks like Trumpton characters.
    fd

    gf

    If I find out three of the guys were called, Cuthbert, Dibble and Grub, then it might be a coincidence beyond old Tharos being in the right place at the right time.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piper_Alpha
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2357290/Piper-Alpha-I-thought-I-pushed-edge-I-thought-I-killed-Survivor-oil-rig-disaster-relives-fear-panic-25-years-later.html

    DalTampra

    #277073
    Tom Dalpra
    Participant

    The edit time is way too short on here for me these days.

    Correction needed. The top photograph in the post above appears to be of Piper Alpha alone and NOT Tharos in the foreground.

    It doesn’t make any difference to my point about Tharos, but it’s a mistake I wish I could edit.

    DalTampra

    #277213
    Tom Dalpra
    Participant

    To clarify, because I’ve been vague about what happened. The explosions blew the back end of the rig into the sea. Gone.

    gf

    “If somebody had said to me that a platform could fall into the sea, I’d have laughed at them. But the reality is you’re sitting on a bomb.”

    Then in the next paragraph the same guy goes on…

    “Piper was synonymous with accidents,” recalls Jake Molloy, head of the offshore trade union OILC. ( safe hands ) “People would say, ‘Piper? Oh, you don’t want to go there. That place is ready to go.'”

    (That reminds me of The Boston Mollasses Tragedy. The, ‘she’s gonna go’ rumour.)

    Anyway, big explosion at 10:50 and the back end fell into the sea at 11:20
    That left the lonely looking little stump. That module wasn’t the entire platform as I’d suggested.

    DalTampra

    #591057
    xileffilex
    Participant

    The wife of an oil worker killed in the Piper Alpha disaster 25 years ago says she still feel her husband by her side
    http://stv.tv/news/north/231099-piper-alpha-widow-still-feels-husband-by-her-side-25-years-on/


    A word or two from Bryan and Maureen Whyte……..

    “Last night was a crackin’ double bill and we’d all like to thank you for a fantastic night at The Beach Ballroom in Aberdeen. I know that Kimmy and Kerri enjoyed it as did our good friends Rob, Nici, Alan & Vicky”

    Photo: Maureen, friend Kimmy and Maureen’s daughter Kerri.
    source – http://stephensmythbandphotogallery.blogspot.co.uk/2007_05_01_archive.html

    http://www.thecourier.co.uk/news/scotland/piper-alpha-memorial-restored-ahead-of-25th-anniversary-1.83180

    The refurbishment was led by the Pound for Piper trust set up by two rig stewardesses anxious about the state of the garden dedicated to the 167 men who lost their lives in the explosion.

    Co-founder Carol Banks planted the final rose of 11,000 provided by Cocker’s Roses to ensure the garden is in full bloom by the July 6 anniversary.

    Donations from member companies of Oil & Gas UK covered about £140,000 of the total £150,000 cost of the refurbishment and Aberdeen City Council made up the remainder.

    The trust said fundraising will continue to ensure the long-term maintenance of the garden.

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 6 months ago by xileffilex.
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