Bird Flu incoming...

All info related to the new biggest hoax of our time.
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rachel
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Re: Bird Flu vaccine trials

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https://sanityunleashed.substack.com/p/ ... sistencies
Serious reporting inconsistencies for the bird flu vaccine trials.
JUN 27, 2024

Jessica Rose has written an excellent substack pointing out some issues with the avian flu vaccine - and these are just the ones they mention in the FDA data sheet.

https://jessicar.substack.com/p/1200-ch ... medium=web

I thought I’d dig into the trials which FDA cite in support of this product. I haven’t finished doing that, but I found one anomaly which looks, on its face, pretty serious.

Before describing that, it’s worth emphasising that the entirety of the “efficacy” evidence for these products rests on the finding that the products ellicit an immune response “immunogenicity” - mainly the creation of “neutralising antibodies”.

So they inject an antigen1 and show that the body creates antibodies to it. We aren’t supposed to question:
  • whether this provides any real immunity anyway (it didn’t for “covid”)
  • how blood-borne antibodies can be relevant for a respiratory infection against which the heavy lifting of the immune system takes place in the mucosal lining of the respiratory tract
  • what focusing on one specific antigen does to long-term immunity to that or related pathogens
  • whether natural immunity might be more durable and flexible than the sledgehammer approach of injecting high doses of a single antigen, and whether the injections might interfere with its development
  • whether the adverse events from the product as a whole offset any demonstrated benefits, since properly controlled all-cause morbidity / mortality trials sufficiently powered to answer this question are never performed
Anyway, on to the thing I found.

Trials 1 and 2 of those cited in the FDA data sheet can be found on clinicaltrials.gov2 here and here. This was a pair of jointly-run trials run around a decade ago, one in the young and one in the elderly. In each trial half the subjects received a low dose and the other half a high dose, there being no control, and subjects were followed up for a year...


...I am struggling to square these inconsistencies.
  • In the elderly trial, no deaths have been reported to the repository, yet one is described in the publication - but stated to be an “SAE with a fatal outcome”. Were there other deaths which weren’t reported in the publication because they weren’t classified as SAEs?
  • Four deaths are reported from the younger trial to the repository, but none are mentioned at all in the publications (dated 6 years after the trial commenced)?
  • Is it likely that there would be only one death in the elderly trial but 4 in the younger one (which had ~30% fewer subjects)?
  • All 4 deaths reported in the young cohort were in the higher dose cohort. Hence nearly 1% of a group of healthy subjects under 65 with average age of 39 died within a year of injection. Yet the conclusion from the publication was:
99cc618c-00af-4018-8678-9969938ff437_1319x302.png

Does anyone else understand what has gone on here? I don’t.

As usual, it’s worth looking for potential conflicts of interest, which I reproduce below without further comment.

b1973252-b81b-430c-879d-8ec1b195ea59_1353x428.jpg
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rachel
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Re: Bird Flu incoming...

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INTERNATIONAL BIRD FLU SUMMIT, 2-4 OCTOBER

Screenshot 2024-07-09 at 03.51.58.png

Who Remembers Event 201? Well There is a New One This October For Bird Flu in 2025


Screenshot 2024-07-09 at 03.57.41.png

I personally think they are planning for the end of the world...but they don't want to admit it just in case it doesn't happen.
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Re: Bird Flu incoming...

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Continuity of operations (COOP)

Cooped up in the chicken coop.
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Re: Bird Flu incoming...

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I am sure we will get a couple more "covid's" and "ukraine's" and "Trump's".
Honestly. This is all leading to a fake rapture. Hoaxed Jesus and angels. A hoaxed revelation. maybe not in our life time.
I'm pretty sure that's what my friend's been telling me.
like the Vicsim list of None Eleven.... Their will be a couple groups in on it standing right beside us.
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Re: Bird Flu incoming...

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https://birdflusummit.com/about-us/

International Bird Flu Summit
Welcome to the International Bird Flu Summit, where we address the pressing concerns surrounding the recent developments in avian influenza. With the emergence of a highly virulent strain of bird flu affecting both cattle and humans, it is imperative that we come together to discuss preparedness, response strategies, and the future implications of this evolving situation
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Re: Bird Flu incoming...

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I AM CONVINCED THAT WEB PAGES ARE BUILT TO DESTROY OUR INTEREST IN READING. THE AMOUNT OF ADDS AND POP UPS AND TRASH. I AM SO IRRITATED OVERALL I POSTED THIS 2/10 INTERESTING ARTICLE FOR THE PURPOSE OF SOMEONE GETTING A CHANCE TO READ IT. I COULDN'T READ IT. TWO SENTENCES PER POP UP ADS OF TRASH
I was looking for information on plague in Leicestershire in 1610
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Lost villages of Leicestershire in times of plague and prosperity shown on vintage map
Gone but not forgotten

News
ByJoyce Parkin
9 JAN 2022
We're not short of settlements dotted across Leicestershire's rolling landscape.
Ranging from bustling market towns like Loughborough and Market Harborough to tiny villages with names to charm and confuse the tourists, like Barton in the Beans and Burton Lazars.
But places rise and fall from time to time - and even drop off the map.
Read more history and nostalgia from LeicestershireLive here.
In fact Leicestershire has about 70 of these sites of long-lost villages.
But while gone, they're not all forgotten.
This map, credited to architect Albert Herbert and thought to date from 1945, collects some of these sites.
Lost villages mapped out
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The names of some of these are fascinating: Mythe, Ambion, Atterton, Naneby and Temple once existed in the east of the county, and Ringlethorpe, Willowes and Bescaby were in the north-east.
Normanton Turville and Potters Marston were not too far from Hinckley and in the southern tip were two villages with the intriguing names of Stormsworth and Westrill.
However, not all of them have unfamiliar names. Hamilton, Glen Parva and Wistow are also on the list, together with Bradgate, Lubbesthorpe, Quenby and Brooksby.
Quite clearly, some of them were re-established. An area like Hamilton is a good example of this rebirth.
It is first recorded by name in the Leicestershire survey of 1130 and its name appears to mean “Hamela’s village”.
Modern Hamilton
It is widely believed that, although Hamilton is not separately recorded by name in the Domesday Book, it can be related to the entry of Robert de Todami’s holding at Barkby and dates back to pre-Conquest times as a settlement. It was never large, covering only 374 acres. Records from 1327 and 1331 reveal nine or 10 distinct family names, but by 1337 there were only four taxpayers, representing three or four homes.
There was a small manor house, a chapel and nine or 10 peasant houses. It was probably deserted before 1450.
An outline of the narrow streets of Ingarsby can still clearly be seen in fields opposite the Old Hall. A hamlet of the mother parish of Hungarton, it is thought to have been founded by the Danes in the late 9th or early 10th centuries. Leicester Abbey was granted the manor in 1352 and it eventually acquired the entire lordship. In 1469, it was enclosed with hedges and ditches, converting most of it to pasture land.
At least a dozen families lived in Ingarsby in 1381. Plague had reduced the population, but there is reason to believe there was much poverty well before the Black Death. The village was deserted after the enclosure in 1469.
The site of the vanished hamlet of Baggrave, near Hungarton, is still clearly to be seen, despite the fact that it was abandoned early in the 16th century. The original line of the village street can be seen in the park as a sunken road lined with old thorn trees. Rubble masonry is still visible in a bank on one side of the street.
Baggrave is mentioned in the Domesday Book. Between 1327 and 1332, there were at least 16 families living there. In addition to the hall, Baggrave had a chapel of its own.
Another little-known village, near South Kilworth, is Downtown in an area near the canal. An outline of the village can be seen from the air. Just over 40 years ago, a Boy Scout group, the 28th Leicester, of Wigston, unearthed 3ft-thick walls and found evidence of skilfully-created land drainage.
Most of the villages have interesting histories. Knaptoft, deserted in the second half of the 15th century, was at one time home to 25 or 30 families and Great Stretton had 15 to 20 farmhouses and cottages. The old church of St Giles still dominates the site.
Varying reasons are given for the demise of these once-prosperous settlements. The Black Death in the 14th century heads the list, but the drying-up of water supplies and the change of use of land from crops to more profitable pasture land for cattle are also put forward.
The least likely explanation is the introduction of the Enclosure Acts and the thinning-out of land-owning families.
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