So when donyou think the Queen really died?

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Sunshineuk
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So when donyou think the Queen really died?

Post by Sunshineuk »

I keep hearing 2018 but am not sure what the basis of that is.
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rachel
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Re: So when donyou think the Queen really died?

Post by rachel »

I think the state opening of parliament would be hard to fake, and all of these appear to be the Queen.

June 2017:
LIVE: State Opening of Parliament, The Queen's speech- BBC NEWS


October 2019:
Queen's Speech 2019 to open parliamentary year FULL


December 2019 (after election):
State Opening of Parliament and the Queen's Speech - December 2019


May 2021:
State Opening of Parliament 2021 | House of Lords



May 2022, Prince Charles took the queen's place, it is said because she couldn't tackle the steps.

Queen’s Speech 2022 in full: Prince Charles opens Parliament for first time
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rachel
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Re: So when donyou think the Queen really died?

Post by rachel »

You know King George V was euthanised.

1936 SECRET IS OUT: DOCTOR SPED GEORGE V'S DEATH
https://www.nytimes.com/1986/11/28/worl ... death.html
As he lay comatose on his deathbed in 1936, King George V was injected with fatal doses of morphine and cocaine to assure him a painless death in time, according to his physician's notes, for the announcement to be carried ''in the morning papers rather than the less appropriate evening journals.''

The fact that the death of a reigning monarch had been medically hastened remained a secret for half a century until the publication today of the notes made at the time by Lord Dawson, the royal physician who recorded that he administered the two injections at about 11 o'clock on the night of Jan. 20, 1936. That was scarcely an hour and a half after Lord Dawson had written a classically brief medical bulletin that declared, ''The King's life is moving peacefully toward its close.''

That ''close'' came in less than an hour after the injections. Lord Dawson, according to his notes, had already taken the precaution of phoning his wife in London to ask that she ''advise The Times to hold back publication.''

In Windsor Castle Archives

''A Peaceful Ending at Midnight,'' said the headline the next morning in the newspaper that was deemed to be the most appropriate vehicle for major announcements to the nation.

The Dawson notes, now preserved in the archives of Windsor Castle, were first examined by the physician's biographer, Francis Watson, when he prepared a volume that appeared in 1950, five years after Lord Dawson's death. At the request of the physician's widow, the biographer said today, he simply omitted any reference to the euthanasia that had taken place at Sandringham Castle.

It was Mr. Watson, now 79 years old, who filled in the omission in an article in a journal called History Today that went on sale here this morning. ''Perhaps I should have included it in the book at the time,'' he said. ''Lady Dawson did not want it in the book and I quite readily agreed. I didn't think it appropriate.'' Queen's Reaction Not Known
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