Interesting things in art

User avatar
rachel
Posts: 4132
Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2018 9:04 pm
Location: Liverpool, England
Has thanked: 1500 times
Been thanked: 1802 times

Interesting things in art

Unread post by rachel »

I came across this and for those who like the history hoax, this might be interesting. Signs of electricity maybe? I fancy armer could act as a faraday cage.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:John ... _in_BL.jpg

John_Ball_encouraging_Wat_Tyler_rebels_from_ca_1470_MS_of_Froissart_Chronicles_in_BL.jpg
The_Peasants'_Revolt_-_Froissart,_Chroniques_de_France_et_d'Angleterre,_Book_II_(c.1460-1480),_f.165v_-_BL_Royal_MS_18_E_I.jpg
John Ball encouraging Wat Tyler rebels from ca 1470 MS of Froissart Chronicles in BL

An illustration of the priest John Ball ("Jehã Balle") on a horse encouraging Wat Tyler's rebels ("Waultre le tieulier") of 1381, from a ca. 1470 manuscript of Jean Froissart's Chronicles in the British Library. There are two flags of England (St. George's cross flags) and two banners of the Plantagenet royal coat of arms of England (quarterly France ancient and England), and an implausible number of unmounted soldiers wearing full plate armour among the rebels.

circa 1470
The second is a second version.
Other image "The Peasants'-Revolt - Froissart- Chroniques de France et d'-Angleterre- Book II -c.1460-1480-- f.165v - BL Royal MS 18 E I"

The Peasants' Revolt (Miniature) The Peasants' Revolt. Two groups of rebels meet outside London. They carry banners of England and St. George. Their leaders John Ball, on horseback, and Wat Tyler, standing left, are labelled 'Jehan Balle' and 'Waultre le Tieulier' respectively.
Looks like an exact copy to me. Both made 1470s. Interesting how it is such an exact copy.
User avatar
rachel
Posts: 4132
Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2018 9:04 pm
Location: Liverpool, England
Has thanked: 1500 times
Been thanked: 1802 times

Re: Interesting things in art

Unread post by rachel »

But it's these features that caught my eye. They look like iron towers to me. And what are the bars sticking up from the roof for? Lot's of crosses too.

A11-84.png
A11-83.png

Then we have what looks like a leaded window and panes of glass.

A11-79.png
A11-81.png

Remember, circa 1470. And the following link regarding the history of glass windows. Guess the second detail might be netting, but it has a certain glass look about it, the diagonal light and dark, that's how you paint glass.

https://www.thenbs.com/knowledge/window ... ef-history
To make window glass, the Romans started with a long balloon of blown glass. They cut off the ends and split the resulting cylinder into two. The half cylinder would be placed on an iron plate and flattened. This manufacturing process meant that openings were limited to a small size, but that changed in the 17th century when, in England, a process for making large panes of glass was discovered.

Unfortunately, this breakthrough didn’t benefit the English when it came to windows in their homes because, in 1696, William III introduced a “window tax”. People were required to pay between two and eight shillings a year, depending upon the number of windows in their houses, and many bricked over their windows in order to avoid the charge. (William’s window tax is where the term “daylight robbery” originates from.) The tax remained in place for 156 years, with the levy-free window allowance going from 10 to six and then to eight. The tax was finally repealed in 1851.

Polished plate glass was introduced to Britain in the late 18th century; however, the production process was so expensive that it was only used for windows in the best rooms of larger, more expensive homes.
User avatar
rachel
Posts: 4132
Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2018 9:04 pm
Location: Liverpool, England
Has thanked: 1500 times
Been thanked: 1802 times

Re: Interesting things in art

Unread post by rachel »

Image

Image

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Ball_(priest)
John Ball (c. 1338 – 15 July 1381) was an English priest who took a prominent part in the Peasants' Revolt of 1381. Although he is often associated with John Wycliffe and the Lollard movement, Ball was actively preaching "articles contrary to the faith of the church" at least a decade before Wycliffe started attracting attention.

His utterances brought him into conflict with Simon of Sudbury, Archbishop of Canterbury, and he was thrown in prison on several occasions. He also appears to have been excommunicated; owing to which, in 1366 it was forbidden for anyone to hear him preach. These measures, however, did not moderate his opinions, nor diminish his popularity, and he took to speaking to parishioners in churchyards after official services.

Shortly after the Peasants' Revolt began, Ball was released by the Kentish rebels from his prison. He preached to them at Blackheath (the peasants' rendezvous to the south of Greenwich) in an open-air sermon that included the following:
  • When Adam delved and Eve span, Who was then the gentleman? From the beginning all men by nature were created alike, and our bondage or servitude came in by the unjust oppression of naughty men. For if God would have had any bondmen from the beginning, He would have appointed who should be bond, and who free. And therefore I exhort you to consider that now the time is come, appointed to us by God, in which ye may (if ye will) cast off the yoke of bondage, and recover liberty.
When the rebels had dispersed, Ball was taken prisoner at Coventry, given a trial in which, unlike most, he was permitted to speak. He was hanged, drawn and quartered at St Albans in the presence of King Richard II on 15 July 1381. His head was displayed stuck on a pike on London Bridge, and the quarters of his body were displayed at four different towns. Called by Froissart "the mad priest of Kent," Ball seems to have possessed the gift of rhyme. He voiced the feelings of a section of the discontented lower orders of society at that time, who chafed at villeinage and the lords' rights of unpaid labour, or corvée.

Then we have the armies, with iron looking plate armour. All wearing head gear.

A11-85.png
A11-78.png
YouCanCallMeAl
Posts: 336
Joined: Sun May 29, 2022 7:36 am
Has thanked: 308 times
Been thanked: 305 times

Re: Interesting things in art

Unread post by YouCanCallMeAl »

It's got to be antiquitech! Ancient technology that's been repressed! They knew about the aether and how to use it for energy..

^^ That's your standard alternative take on history etc.

I don't know what the past was. I suspect that churches were nothing to do with either religion or energy.
Post Reply